BookEd: Hesseov Sidarta

Knjiga, za koju vjerujem da sam je pročitala u nekom ranijem razdoblju života, bi ostala potpuno suštinski nepoznata za mene. Čak i sada, vjerujem da nijesam istinski razumjela cijelu knjigu, i ne sumnjam da ću joj se uskoro ponovo vratiti.

Kao da je Hesse u svojoj knjizi, opisao jedan cijeli životni ciklus – za sve one koji su se zapitali da li je svrha života biti kao budisti, da li je poenta živjeti život užurbano ili smireno, kroz sve to prolazi glavni lik, Gautama. Ipak, pouke sa njegovog putovanja nisu jedini razlog zbog me je ova knjiga i zamislila, i oduševila. Nosi u sebi priču o promjeni, o tome da čovjek može da promijeni mnogo usmjerenja, htijenja i formi tokom života. O tome da se stalno možemo ponovo otkriti i ispočetka stvoriti.

Knjigu treba da pročitaš ako si otvorenog uma, i ako možeš da joj posvetiš vrijeme. Izuzetno je lako čitljiva i zato se može završiti za jedno popodne, ali ideje iz knjige se onda ne mogu sagledati. Posebno je interesantna ako razmišljaš o smislu života, o unutrašnjem Ja, i ako tragaš za nečim što ne možeš da definišeš. Možda najinteresantnije, u knjizi se ulazi u prirodu čovjeka koji traga.

“When someone seeks, then it easily happens that his eyes see only the thing that he seeks, and he is able to find nothing, to take in nothing because he always thinks only about the thing he is seeking, because he has one goal, because he is obsessed with his goal. Seeking means: having a goal. But finding means: being free, being open, having no goal.” 

Ovu knjigu smatram dragocjenom jer mi je dala priliku da razjasnim koncepte koji su na ivici svjesnog razmišljanja o njima, ali isto tako vjerujem da je nje

Odlomci koji su ostavili poseban dojam na mene se nalaze u produžetku.

“You’ve been lucky,” she said when they parted, “I’m opening
one door after another for you. How come? Do you have a
spell?”
Siddhartha said: “Yesterday, I told you I knew how to think,
to wait, and to fast, but you thought this was of no use. But it is
useful for many things, Kamala, you’ll see. You’ll see that the
stupid Samanas are learning and able to do many pretty things
in the forest, which the likes of you aren’t capable of. The day
before yesterday, I was still a shaggy beggar, as soon as yes-
terday I have kissed Kamala, and soon I’ll be a merchant and
have money and all those things you insist upon.”
“Well yes,” she admitted. “But where would you be without
me? What would you be, if Kamala wasn’t helping you?”
“Dear Kamala,” said Siddhartha and straightened up to his
full height, “when I came to you into your grove, I did the first
step. It was my resolution to learn love from this most beautiful
woman. From that moment on when I had made this resolution,
I also knew that I would carry it out. I knew that you would
help me, at your first glance at the entrance of the grove I
already knew it.”
“But what if I hadn’t been willing?”
“You were willing. Look, Kamala: When you throw a rock into
the water, it will speed on the fastest course to the bottom of
the water. This is how it is when Siddhartha has a goal, a resol-
ution. Siddhartha does nothing, he waits, he thinks, he fasts,
but he passes through the things of the world like a rock
through water, without doing anything, without stirring; he is
drawn, he lets himself fall. His goal attracts him, because he
doesn’t let anything enter his soul which might oppose the
goal. This is what Siddhartha has learned among the Samanas.
This is what fools call magic and of which they think it would
be effected by means of the daemons. Nothing is effected by
daemons, there are no daemons. Everyone can perform magic,
everyone can reach his goals, if he is able to think, if he is able
to wait, if he is able to fast.”

Kamaswami read: “Writing is good, thinking is better. Being

smart is good, being patient is better.”

And thinking of Kamala’s words, he was never subservient to the

merchant, forced him to treat him as an equal, yes even more

than an equal.

Him, who was, regarding love,

still a boy and had a tendency to plunge blindly and insatiably

into lust like into a bottomless pit, him she taught, thoroughly

starting with the basics, about that school of thought which

teaches that pleasure cannot be be taken without giving pleas-

ure, and that every gesture, every caress, every touch, every

look, every spot of the body, however small it was, had its

secret, which would bring happiness to those who know about

it and unleash it.

This Brahman,” he said to a friend, “is no proper merchant

and will never be one, there is never any passion in his soul

when he conducts our business. But he has that mysterious

quality of those people to whom success comes all by itself,

whether this may be a good star of his birth, magic, or

something he has learned among Samanas. He always seems

to be merely playing with out business-affairs, they never fully

become a part of him, they never rule over him, he is never

afraid of failure, he is never upset by a loss.”

 

Look, my dear, if I had been Kamaswami, I would have

travelled back, being annoyed and in a hurry, as soon as I had

seen that my purchase had been rendered impossible, and time

and money would indeed have been lost. But like this, I’ve had

a few good days, I’ve learned, had joy, I’ve neither harmed my-

self nor others by annoyance and hastiness. And if I’ll ever re-

turn there again, perhaps to buy an upcoming harvest, or for

whatever purpose it might be, friendly people will receive me

50in a friendly and happy manner, and I will praise myself for not

showing any hurry and displeasure at that time.

“Not all people are smart,” said Kamala.

“No,” said Siddhartha, “that’s not the reason why.

Kamaswami is just as smart as I, and still has no refuge in him-

self. Others have it, who are small children with respect to

their mind. Most people, Kamala, are like a falling leaf, which

is blown and is turning around through the air, and wavers,

and tumbles to the ground. But others, a few, are like stars,

they go on a fixed course, no wind reaches them, in themselves

they have their law and their course. Among all the learned

men and Samanas, of which I knew many, there was one of this

kind, a perfected one, I’ll never be able to forget him. It is that

Gotama, the exalted one, who is spreading that teachings.

Thousands of followers are listening to his teachings every day,

follow his instructions every hour, but they are all falling

leaves, not in themselves they have teachings and a law.”

 

“He still sat there, when

the night had fallen. When, looking up, he caught sight of the

stars, he thought: “Here I’m sitting under my mango-tree, in

my pleasure-garden.” He smiled a little —was it really neces-

sary, was it right, was it not as foolish game, that he owned a

mango-tree, that he owned a garden?”

“I have always believed, and I still believe, that whatever good or bad fortune may come our way we can always give it meaning and transform it into something of value.”

 

“Wisdom cannot be imparted. Wisdom that a wise man attempts to impart always sounds like foolishness to someone else … Knowledge can be communicated, but not wisdom. One can find it, live it, do wonders through it, but one cannot communicate and teach it.”

“I shall no longer be instructed by the Yoga Veda or the Aharva Veda, or the ascetics, or any other doctrine whatsoever. I shall learn from myself, be a pupil of myself; I shall get to know myself, the mystery of Siddhartha.” He looked around as if he were seeing the world for the first time.”

“We are not going in circles, we are going upwards. The path is a spiral; we have already climbed many steps.”

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